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Great Argus Pheasant

Argusianus Argus
Conservation Status: 
Near Threatened. Their population is in decline due to hunting and trapping, logging and wood harvesting, and climate changes such as droughts.
Range: 
Southeast Asia, in Thailand, Myanmar, Brunei Darussalam, Sumatra, and Malaysia.
Habitat: 
Tall, dry, lowland primary and logged forests.

Weight: Males: 2 to 2.72 kg. Females: 1.59 to 1.7 kg.

Length: Males: 160 to 200 cm, with a tail length of 105 to 143 cm.

Females: 72 to 76 cm, with a tail length of 30 to 36 cm.

Wingspan: Unknown.

Description: Males: They are a large pheasant, of a mainly greyish-brown colour. Their head is a bit more blue, and their chest is a bit more rufous. Their secondary wing feathers are large, very noticeable, and decorated with eyespots. They have a very long tail.

Females: They look similar to the males but it’s very obvious that they are missing the grand secondary wing feathers, and the long tail.

Diet: Fruit, grains, seeds, and insects, scavenged from the forest floor.

Breeding: The male Great Argus Pheasant will prepare a special area, involving a ring made of sticks and twigs on the ground, in which to perform an elaborate display to impress a female. His feathers will splay out into a cone-like form which he aims at her. She will lay two eggs and incubate them alone.

Behaviour/Adaptations: Unlike other Galliformes, the Great Argus has no uropygial gland (oil gland). They roost in trees at night but forage on their ground for their food.

Conservation Status: Near Threatened. Their population is in decline due to hunting and trapping, logging and wood harvesting, and climate changes such as droughts.